Issue 229 - Our planet, our future

rat
Find out more about
Net Languages courses
Basic

Vocabulary: Words related to nature

Look and listen.

 

Can you remember? Choose the correct option.

 

The news story

Read and listen to the news story.

Our planet, our future

Thousands of British schoolchildren have protested about climate change. They didn’t go to school that day.

About 10,000 young people in 60 towns and cities joined the protests. They are asking the government to stop global warming.

About 3,000 young people went to Parliament Square, London. They had banners with different messages; for example, “Act now for our future” and “System change, not climate change”.

“Climate change is a big problem, and the government isn’t doing enough to stop it,” one young protester said. “Young people are very angry,” she said. The children want the government to change laws to protect the environment. And they want to study climate change in school.

The idea for the protests in Britain came from Greta Thunberg. She is a 16-year-old Swedish schoolgirl. In August 2018, she started to protest every Friday against global warming. On that day she doesn’t go to school. Now many young people follow her example. About 70,000 schoolchildren in 270 towns and cities in Europe and Australia protest against climate change every Friday.

Find out more about
Net Languages courses
Intermediate

Grammar: Verbs and prepositions

Choose the best option.

The news story

Read and listen to the news story.

Our planet, our future

Thousands of British schoolchildren didn’t go to school on Friday. Instead, they went to protest against climate change.

About 10,000 young people in 60 towns and cities all over the country joined the protests. They want the government to do something to stop global warming.

Nearly 3,000 young people went to Parliament Square, London, carrying banners with messages such as “Act now for our future”, “Climate over capitalism” or “System change, not climate change”.

“We are running out of time and governments aren’t doing enough to stop climate change,” one young activist said. “Young people feel very angry,” she added. Protesters are asking the government to control global warming, change laws to protect the environment and include climate change in the school curriculum.

The British protests were inspired by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish schoolgirl. In August 2018, she started skipping school on Fridays to protest against global warming. She wants the Swedish government to reduce carbon emissions as it promised when it signed the Paris Agreement.

Greta has inspired young people all over the world to follow her example. About 70,000 schoolchildren in 270 towns and cities across Europe and Australia protest every week, demanding climate action.

Find out more about
Net Languages courses
Advanced

Vocabulary: Negative feelings

Choose the best word to complete the sentence.

The news story

Read and listen to the news story.

Our planet, our future

Thousands of British schoolchildren have skipped school to protest against climate change.

According to organisers, around 10,000 young people in 60 towns and cities all over the country joined the protests, demanding the government take action to deal with global warming.

Despite threats of detention from some school authorities, an estimated 3,000 young people gathered in Parliament Square, London, carrying banners with messages such as “Act now for our future”, “Climate over capitalism”, “System change, not climate change” and other slogans.

“We are running out of time and governments aren’t doing enough to combat climate change,” one young activist told reporters. “Young people feel betrayed and angry,” she added. Protesters are asking the government to take urgent action to control global warming, implement environmental reform, declare a climate emergency and change the school curriculum to include climate change.

The British protests were inspired by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old Swedish schoolgirl who, since August 2018, has skipped school on Fridays to protest against global warming and demand that the Swedish government reduce carbon emissions in accordance with the Paris Climate Agreement.

With her sign saying “School strike for the climate” Greta has made international headlines and has inspired young people all over the world to follow her example. Up to 70,000 schoolchildren in 270 towns and cities across Europe and Australia take to the streets every week, demanding radical climate action.

Interview: listen to more about the topic

Think about your answers to the following questions. Then listen to somebody answering the same questions. Were your answers similar?

Find out more about
Net Languages courses