Issue 262 - Animals with feelings

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Basic

Vocabulary: Animals that live in the sea

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Animals with feelings

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Animals with feelings

A study in the UK has found that octopuses, crabs, lobsters and other invertebrates are sentient beings. This means that they are animals with feelings, and require legal protection.

The study, by the London School of Economics, shows that sea creatures, like cephalopods, are sensitive animals and feel pain and distress. As a result, changes are possible in how these animals are treated in the UK, and putting live lobsters in boiling water could be prohibited.

Octopuses and other cephalopods are protected in scientific research, but until now are not protected in other areas. The change in the law is designed to eliminate this inconsistency, but not affect too much restaurant or fishing practices.

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Animals with feelings

Read the text and listen to the audio. Then answer the questions in the Comprehension section.

Animals with feelings

A recent study in the UK recommends classifying octopuses, crabs, lobsters and other invertebrates as sentient beings. This means that they are animals with feelings, and require legal protection.

The study, carried out at the London School of Economics, reveals that certain sea creatures, primarily cephalopods, are sensitive animals and feel pain and distress. This could result in changes in the treatment and sacrifice of these animals in the UK, which could mean, for example, the banning of boiling lobsters live.

For a number of years, octopuses and other cephalopods have been protected in scientific research, but until now have not received protection outside of scientific practice. The proposed legislation is designed to eliminate this inconsistency, but without drastically affecting restaurant or fishing practices.

The authors of the study argue that in accepting that an animal has feelings, it is necessary to apply the same principles that are accepted for other sensitive living things.

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Advanced

 

Animals with feelings

Read the text and listen to the audio. Then answer the questions in the Comprehension section.

Animals with feelings

A recent study in the UK has resulted in recommendations to classify octopuses, crabs, lobsters and other invertebrates as sentient beings, meaning that they are animals with feelings, and require legal protection.

The study, carried out at the London School of Economics, has come up with conclusive evidence that certain sea creatures, primarily cephalopods, are sensitive animals and capable of feeling pain and distress. These findings have led to possible changes in the treatment and sacrifice of these animals in the UK, which could mean, for example, the banning of boiling lobsters live.

As a result of the study findings, the British government is currently working on reforming animal welfare laws, however, these changes are yet to be voted on and passed.

For a number of years, octopuses and other cephalopods have been protected in scientific research, but until now have not received protection outside the field of science. The proposed legislation is designed to eliminate this inconsistency, but without drastically affecting restaurants or how fishing is carried out, even though the study strongly rejects practices such as the removal of crab claws or the boiling of lobsters live.

The authors of the study affirm that in accepting that an animal has feelings, it is necessary to apply the same principles that are accepted for other sensitive living things. 

Now answer the questions in the Comprehension section.

Comprehension: Check your understanding

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Interview: listen to more about the topic

Think about your answers to the following questions. Then listen to somebody answering the same questions. Were your answers similar?

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